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    What We Do

    At Accounting for Energy, our vision is to build a mutually beneficial, rewarding marketplace
    for landowners who have renewable energy projects on their land.

    That’s why all our services help to increase transparency in this new and largely unregulated
    industry – while equipping and empowering landowners and the other people we help with
    the insights they need to benefit fully from their renewables projects.

     

     

  • Tag Archives: investment


    A glimmer of hope for onshore wind?

    By Freccia Benn  – (3 min read)

    Last year we looked at what might happen once the government’s Feed-in Tariff ended in March in this blog. A new law set to replace FiTs has received a mixed reception so far, but at a time when the future of onshore wind looks uncertain, could this new law be the glimmer of hope for small-scale renewable energy generators?

    Despite findings that onshore wind is an inexpensive way to produce electricity, the support for offshore wind seems to keep growing. Recently, it was announced that a new funding pot of £100m will help companies capitalise on the boom in the offshore sector. This comes at the same time as Theresa May announcing that the UK will become a zero carbon nation by 2050, to which trade body, Renewable UK, has responded that onshore wind needs to be a key part of the strategy in achieving this. Against this backdrop, the frustration is understandable for those in a position to create clean energy through onshore wind.

    But could the introduction of the Smart Export Guarantee (SEG), a new law that will see small energy producers paid for excess energy they create that goes back to the grid by their energy companies, be a small turning point?

    The SEG, which will cover both wind and solar, will apply to any new contracts and will be based on the ‘export rate’ alone, whereas FiTs were based on both the export and generator rate. The other key difference is that the energy company can set their rate rather than using the fixed rate the government provided previously. Critics suggest it’s a backhanded way to reintroduce subsidies for new projects and the expansion of existing ones.

    So, is this a positive move? Small generators are less likely to get as favourable a rate as was available in the past, but any help the sector can get has got to be a good thing. Of course, the challenge for many of the companies which would be able to contribute to helping us reach the 2050 target with subsidy support, still remains. While money is being pumped into offshore wind, small gestures such as these do not go far enough to exploit the benefits of onshore wind.

    For further information, please contact:

    Freccia Benn

    Co-Founder

    0203 876 0324

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    Looking to a future beyond the Feed-in Tariff for Landowners

    By Travis Benn – (5 min read)

    The government’s Feed-in Tariff scheme has stimulated growth of small-scale renewable energy generation since its launch in 2010, so there is understandable concern among landowners and farmers, about what will happen when the scheme closes to new applicants next March.

    Indeed, repeated tariff cuts, combined with other policy changes such as closure of the Renewables Obligation to new projects last year have already dented investor confidence.

    This is highlighted in a recent Commons environmental audit committee report that says there has been a “dramatic and worrying collapse” in annual investment in clean energy over the past three years, which last year fell to its lowest level for a decade.

    It’s clear many farm-based projects may well have failed to go ahead without FiTs, especially in the early days when technology costs were higher, and despite industry calls for support beyond 2019, it looks likely future projects will have to work without subsidies.

    Make it pay
    Maximising the onsite use of electricity generation is already essential to the viability of many new farm-based projects and will be even more so in the absence of FiT generation and export payments.

    Energy-intensive rural businesses, such as those with indoor poultry or livestock, cold stores, or processing facilities, will have most to gain from generating their own electricity and reducing the amount bought from the grid (at typically 12-15p/kWh), but other opportunities may well arise as technology evolves.

    A big driver is the electrification of transport that is already seeing many leading motor manufacturers develop hybrid or electric vehicles.

    Agriculture is no exception to this, with several firms already offering battery-powered machines (e.g. the Kramer 5055e loader, and electric ATV companies), and others hoping to bring new designs to market in the near future (e.g. John Deere’s SESAM tractor and the Fendt Vario e100).

    This will inevitably create more onsite demand for farm businesses using electric machines and may well improve the economics of installing new, or additional renewable energy generation to meet that need.

    Balancing energy supplies with the daily demand profile of farm businesses remains a key hurdle, but there are ways this can be overcome.

    Having a mix of energy generating assets, such as wind turbines alongside a solar array, can help provide a more even supply, as can co-located batteries that store surplus energy generated at peak times rather than it being exported to the grid.

    There is an increasing choice of both large and small-scale battery systems on the market and although the economics of battery storage may still not quite stack up for many farmers just yet, it is certainly something to consider as technology improves and costs fall.

    There may be further financial help for early adopters too. For example, earlier this year the government made grant funding available for farmers and landowners to increase on-farm renewable energy use by improving energy storage and distribution. The RDPE Countryside Productivity Scheme offered capital grants worth up to 40% of eligible costs for a range of items, including battery storage systems.

    A further opportunity, perhaps where there is no significant on-site power demand, is the establishment of a private wire supply deal with a nearby business that can utilise the energy, or consider a corporate Power Purchase Agreement.

    A recent Smartest Energy report suggests the removal of subsidy support could see more corporate PPAs established between energy generators and large energy users (e.g. firms from retail or banking sectors) who are keen to secure long-term energy supplies and support sustainability goals.

    So while we may be waving goodbye to financial support for renewables for now at least, there are some big technological and political drivers that could present future opportunities for farmers and landowners. Building on the success of the FiT will be key if the government is going to meet its legally-binding target to decarbonise by 2050.

    For further information, please contact:

    Travis Benn

    Co-Founder

    0203 375 6144

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    Renewable energy offers financial opportunities for waste and energy companies

    By Accounting for Energy – (3 min read)

    BEIS figures declared 2017 the greenest year so far, with pre-Christmas figures showing renewable electricity generation up by 5% year-on-year. But what does this mean for investors and operators? And how does the financial case for renewables stack up against traditional fossil fuels?

    In the past, renewables faced two major barriers when it came to investment – appetite, and cost. Many investors were put off by what they perceived to be the uncertainty of renewables projects. Energy storage, and transmission and siting challenges were often listed as problems and, quite simply, backers were more comfortable with the familiarity of fossil fuels. Thankfully, change has come. These days, green finance is not only becoming routine, but research by HSBC shows that 68% of global investors are planning to increase their low carbon investments.

    Capital costs for renewables sometimes seem high. However, the majority of the finance is called for at the build stage and, once up and running, plants are extremely cheap to operate. If costs are assessed over the lifespan of the facility, wind and solar offer one of the most cost-efficient options for energy generation. Add to this the fact that capital costs for hardware such as photovoltaic modules (which dropped by 80% in 10 years) have fallen solidly year on year, and the investment looks much more appealing.

    Where fossil fuel technologies operate within an established array of infrastructure and skill, renewables – which tend to be smaller scale, decentralised operations – are relatively new technologies which also require connecting up to wider infrastructures. A growing army of expertise and rapid advances in equipment are overcoming these challenges and helping to make renewables a viable financial proposition.

    According to a report from the World Economic Forum, solar and wind have already achieved parity with fossil fuels in more than 30 countries. Ten years ago, solar generation cost around $600 per MWh, compared with $100 for coal and natural gas. Today, solar has reduced its costs to $100, with wind at $50 – half the cost of established fossil fuels.

    At some point in the 2020s, newly installed renewable projects are expected to undercut the cost of producing electricity from traditional plants, at which point there is likely to be an even faster swing to clean energy.

    This could be the incentive needed to drive change in the UK which, despite making impressive inroads to carbon reduction, is still falling short of its legally-binding climate change targets.

    To check whether your land rent payments are accurate, get in touch with our specialists auditors today.

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  • Testimonials

    • “We found your report informative and easy to read, it was good to see how the wind farm is performing
      and we were pleased with the results of the audit”

       

      Mark Charles,

      Exeter

      Share
    • Sara James,

      Durham

      Share
    • Martin Roberts,

      Peterborough

      Share
    • Tracy Maria,

      Cumbria

      Share
    • David Terrence,

      Devon

      Share
    • “In every instance Accounting for Energy have identified and recovered shortfalls in rent for my clients. Not only do the landowners receive back payments but they are also keen to show developers that they are being held to account.”

       

      Chris Thyer MRICS FAAV

      Land Agent, GSC Grays

      Share
    • “We don’t have comparable leases in renewable energy meaning there are few examples to draw from, so it’s always good to have checks and balances in place. We would recommend Accounting for Energy for their diligence.”

       

      Ali Walker

      Property Co-ordinator, Bath and Wells Diocese, Church of England

      Share
    • “The information provided by the turbine owner seemed to be comprehensive. The issue comes with knowing if all the data is complete and the audit was able to identify areas that we should have been receiving royalties on.”

       

      Ben Ardern

      Financial Controller, Dewlay Cheesemakers

      Share
    • “I worked with Travis on a set of arbitral proceedings to recover unpaid royalties on behalf of the landowners of a large renewable energy site. I was very inspired by his passion for his industry and his tireless commitment to getting the best results.”

       

      Sarah Bishop,

      Commercial Disputes Solicitor

      Share
    • “Travis is the go-to person for renewable energy landowner royalty payments. He gets into the details of a case, and is very tenacious in identifying and recovering any monies owed to landowners.”

       

      Grant Jones,

      Chartered accountant, solicitor and practicing arbitrator

      Share
    • “I would recommend Accounting for Energy because they are clearly experts in this area, and they were good to work with. It was an easy
      decision to get them on board because we really didn’t have the expertise or the time to be trawling through the lease and power purchase agreement.”

       

      Nick Kenyon,

      CEO, Dewlay Cheesemakers

      Share
  •  

    Before Accounting for Energy, Freccia was a successful entrepreneur in the healthcare space. When Travis told her about the challenges in the renewables sector, she was convinced that they could use their combined expertise to help landowners.

    Fuelled by her passion for business and making a difference to landowners, Freccia then developed her ideas for Accounting for Energy’s services, strategy and pricing in a way that would best serve their clients.

    She is now responsible for all the business’ operational activities and client services, and her passion for helping landowners in the UK continues to drive her work.

     

     

    “With the threat of climate change to our planet looming, my mission is to develop a business that helps build the infrastructure of the renewable energy market. I also want to make sure those who are invested in it receive fair returns. As this is still a new industry, we are able to help to avoid the pitfalls of other more established industries and by doing so, help the wider green economy.”

     

    Freccia Benn
    Co-Founder

     

    0203 876 0324

     

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  • Our Clients

    Our Clients

    • “We found your report informative and easy to read, it was good to see how the wind farm is performing
      and we were pleased with the results of the audit”

       

      Mark Charles,

      Exeter

    • “Job well done”

       

      Sara James,

      Durham

    • “Early non-payment discovered so very happy with outcome”

       

      Martin Roberts,

      Peterborough

    • “Excellent service. The review has given me peace of mind”

       

      Tracy Maria,

      Cumbria

    • “We found the report very thorough and really interesting and were pleased
      that the payments have been corrected and appreciate your help with this very much”

       

      David Terrence,

      Devon

    • “In every instance Accounting for Energy have identified and recovered shortfalls in rent for my clients. Not only do the landowners receive back payments but they are also keen to show developers that they are being held to account.”

       

      Chris Thyer MRICS FAAV

      Land Agent, GSC Grays

    • “We don’t have comparable leases in renewable energy meaning there are few examples to draw from, so it’s always good to have checks and balances in place. We would recommend Accounting for Energy for their diligence.”

       

      Ali Walker

      Property Co-ordinator, Bath and Wells Diocese, Church of England

    • “The information provided by the turbine owner seemed to be comprehensive. The issue comes with knowing if all the data is complete and the audit was able to identify areas that we should have been receiving royalties on.”

       

      Ben Ardern

      Financial Controller, Dewlay Cheesemakers

    • “I worked with Travis on a set of arbitral proceedings to recover unpaid royalties on behalf of the landowners of a large renewable energy site. I was very inspired by his passion for his industry and his tireless commitment to getting the best results.”

       

      Sarah Bishop,

      Commercial Disputes Solicitor

    • “Travis is the go-to person for renewable energy landowner royalty payments. He gets into the details of a case, and is very tenacious in identifying and recovering any monies owed to landowners.”

       

      Grant Jones,

      Chartered accountant, solicitor and practising arbitrator

    • ““I would recommend Accounting for Energy because they are clearly experts in this area, and they were good to work with. It was an easy
      decision to get them on board because we really didn’t have the expertise or the time to be trawling through the lease and power purchase agreement.”

       

      Nick Kenyon,

      CEO, Dewlay Cheesemakers


  • Testimonial with bg

    • “We found your report informative and easy to read, it was good to see how the wind farm is performing
      and we were pleased with the results of the audit”

       

      Mark Charles,

      Exeter

      Share
    • Sara James,

      Durham

      Share
    • Martin Roberts,

      Peterborough

      Share
    • Tracy Maria,

      Cumbria

      Share
    • David Terrence,

      Devon

      Share
    • “In every instance Accounting for Energy have identified and recovered shortfalls in rent for my clients. Not only do the landowners receive back payments but they are also keen to show developers that they are being held to account.”

       

      Chris Thyer MRICS FAAV

      Land Agent, GSC Grays

      Share
    • “We don’t have comparable leases in renewable energy meaning there are few examples to draw from, so it’s always good to have checks and balances in place. We would recommend Accounting for Energy for their diligence.”

       

      Ali Walker

      Property Co-ordinator, Bath and Wells Diocese, Church of England

      Share
    • “The information provided by the turbine owner seemed to be comprehensive. The issue comes with knowing if all the data is complete and the audit was able to identify areas that we should have been receiving royalties on.”

       

      Ben Ardern

      Financial Controller, Dewlay Cheesemakers

      Share
    • “I worked with Travis on a set of arbitral proceedings to recover unpaid royalties on behalf of the landowners of a large renewable energy site. I was very inspired by his passion for his industry and his tireless commitment to getting the best results.”

       

      Sarah Bishop,

      Commercial Disputes Solicitor

      Share
    • “Travis is the go-to person for renewable energy landowner royalty payments. He gets into the details of a case, and is very tenacious in identifying and recovering any monies owed to landowners.”

       

      Grant Jones,

      Chartered accountant, solicitor and practicing arbitrator

      Share
    • “I would recommend Accounting for Energy because they are clearly experts in this area, and they were good to work with. It was an easy
      decision to get them on board because we really didn’t have the expertise or the time to be trawling through the lease and power purchase agreement.”

       

      Nick Kenyon,

      CEO, Dewlay Cheesemakers

      Share

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